Jump to content


Photo

how can I keep edges of work straight?


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 fcwrigs

fcwrigs

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 1 posts

  • Joined 01-December 07

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:14 PM

I am a self taught crocheter and new to this message board. I can keep edges straight on small pieces, but when I attempt a large piece, like an afghan, the edges begin to flare out. I am picking up extra stitches, but I don't know how or why. Most posts I've seen on this board say their work gets smaller, but my width consistently gets larger as the rows go by. I am starting an afghan again--how can I keep the edges straight? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.



#2 MsSuzKelly

MsSuzKelly

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 1,314 posts

  • Joined 04-December 06
  • Location: Lawrenceville, GA

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:26 PM

Hi there and welcome!

Well, I think what you are probably doing is when you start a new row - you are most likely putting your first stitch in same stitch just under your turning chain. You need to go into the next stitch! Your turning ch is your first stitch of a new row. :)
Suzy

#3 Aggie May

Aggie May

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 3,144 posts

  • Joined 22-April 05
  • Location: Hamilton, New Zealand

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:33 PM

:cheerIt will depend entirely what stitch you are doing your afghan.
It is very important to make sure you start and finish in the correct place on each row and each different stitch has a different place to do this.

:hookLet me know what stitch you are using and I will see if I can describe to you exactly what you need to do.

I have some very easy ideas for afghans with the instructions written in a simple form so they are easier to understand.
So far most people have been able to use them with no problems.

I have a Simple Round Ripple, a Simple Ripple (which is worked side to side) and a Shell Pattern which is extra easy because it is only one row repeated over and over, after you do the foundation row.

PM me if you need any of these patterns.

You can also do a large Granny Square which is worked in "Rounds" until it is the size you want.

Hope this helps.
Have fun.
Colleen:hug

#4 texasredhead

texasredhead

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 3,417 posts

  • Joined 16-January 07
  • Location: Texas

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:38 PM

Hi there and welcome!

Well, I think what you are probably doing is when you start a new row - you are most likely putting your first stitch in same stitch just under your turning chain. You need to go into the next stitch! Your turning ch is your first stitch of a new row. :)



I totally agree!! One thing that I do is always count the row to make sure it is the same as the last. Even if you have to adjust a bit it will stay straight for you. But, I think you are probably not using your turning chain as the first stitch in the next row. :hook
RAOK list 16 #3
8 inch squares needed for friendship ghan
cream, sage, or berry.

#5 pattyb854

pattyb854

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 16 posts

  • Joined 13-November 07

Posted 13 January 2008 - 06:20 PM

Aggie may, i would be interested in te patterns that you said you have . I am a new crochet hooker also, and alot of the instructions i cannot figure out. I would love to learn to do the ripple. Thank you
Pat

#6 Granny Square

Granny Square

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 6,657 posts

  • Joined 18-June 07
  • Location: Pacific Northwest

Posted 13 January 2008 - 06:26 PM

Yes to all of the above...also, make sure you keep your tension even. I've been crocheting for eons, but I find that if I'm tired, stressed, in a hurry/whatever, my tension will wander a bit, which really shows up on a large piece.

Granny Square


#7 shelly_bean

shelly_bean

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 1,116 posts

  • Joined 12-July 07
  • Location: [El Paso, Texas]

Posted 15 January 2008 - 12:17 AM

Hi there and welcome!

Well, I think what you are probably doing is when you start a new row - you are most likely putting your first stitch in same stitch just under your turning chain. You need to go into the next stitch! Your turning ch is your first stitch of a new row. :)


I agree. unless it specifically states to do so you should always skip the first stitch in the row.

My Blog


on ravelry i am rosebudstar
Free Rice donate some today click the link
donated 8000 grains of rice to date.
Google is your friend. :D

#8 jleinhauser

jleinhauser

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 972 posts

  • Joined 03-May 07
  • Location: San Diego

Posted 15 January 2008 - 06:53 AM

You don't always skip the first stitch of the row. In single crochet, and sometimes in hdc (depending on the pattern) you do indeed work into the first stitch.

The most important thing is to count y our stitches at the end of EVERY
row.

Jean Leinhauser

#9 jeannie1205

jeannie1205

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 470 posts

  • Joined 01-January 08
  • Location: Queens Village, NY

Posted 15 January 2008 - 08:40 AM

You don't always skip the first stitch of the row. In single crochet, and sometimes in hdc (depending on the pattern) you do indeed work into the first stitch.

The most important thing is to count y our stitches at the end of EVERY
row.

Jean Leinhauser

I agree with that. I've had patterns that require the one ch and a sc in same stitch. I think the best way to keep track is by counting even if you don't want to do it every row then do a count every three or four rows but remember that if you were off and started adding stitches then you'll need to undo those rows that are incorrect and go back. I guess it would be a personal option.
~ Jeannie ~


http://s244.photobucket.com/albums/gg32/jeannie1205/

#10 LadiBug329

LadiBug329

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 1,411 posts

  • Joined 08-January 08
  • Location: Laurel, DE

Posted 24 January 2008 - 06:03 PM

i am pretty new at crocheting too, and i have found that if i count the stitches as i go, my piece will stay straight...luckily the first piece i crocheted was a dishcloth, and not counting the stitches made the piece increase at an angle. I didn't frog it cuz it was just a dishcloth for me, but i count each stitch now. For long pieces, I use stitch counters - those little loopy things you insert after so many stitches.
Crissie
Ladibug Landing

#11 darski

darski

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 12,536 posts

  • Joined 04-March 06
  • Location: Niagara Region of Canada

Posted 25 January 2008 - 01:50 AM

We keep posting the link to this video from you tube but it might help in this case as well.

at about 1:55 of the video she discusses beginning a new row.



It is a very good video for general viewing anyway but certain specific points get noticed.

When in doubt... make a hat.      And feel free to *pin* me.
http://groups.yahoo....p/dudsfordoras/

Shawl We Crochet CAL


#12 roravenclaw

roravenclaw

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 3 posts

  • Joined 25-January 08
  • Location: Nottingham, PA

Posted 28 January 2008 - 09:31 PM

I have been surfing through these boards and I can't believe how much I am learning. I have been having this same problem with my work! I know that when I am turning my chains, I am starting in the wrong place. I so know that I do have some difficulty with m y tension too. I have been doing some practice pieces, small ones, just to try to adjust that. Thank you, thank you thank you! this site is awesome

#13 darski

darski

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 12,536 posts

  • Joined 04-March 06
  • Location: Niagara Region of Canada

Posted 28 January 2008 - 09:48 PM

I have been surfing through these boards and I can't believe how much I am learning.


This truly is the world's most amazing crocheting community. We are all pleased that you have been helped as that seems to be what the Ville does best. :crocheting

:hug

:cheer

When in doubt... make a hat.      And feel free to *pin* me.
http://groups.yahoo....p/dudsfordoras/

Shawl We Crochet CAL


#14 eurolyons

eurolyons

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 4,133 posts

  • Joined 22-October 05
  • Location: Vashon Island, Washington State

Posted 29 January 2008 - 02:42 AM

I'm a crocheter of many decades and even I have the occasional problem of adding or substracting stitches when I'm not suppose to and what I've had to finally accept, especially with working with other people's patterns is that I have to count occasionally to make sure I'm on track. Heck, even when I'm designing my own things, I have to occasionally count to make sure I have the right amount. I'm designing a scarf and I'll be darned if somewhere in the process I lost a stitch or two...

I will say that I do appreciate those pattern writers that put in their instructions, "ch 3 (counts as first dc)" or whatever because then I know to skip the first dc from the previous row (you find this alot in filet crochet.)

As another poster said too, tension is important. When I'm working on things like sweaters and afghans, my tension is fairly loose and I'm okay with that...but when one is working on a doily in crochet crochet, the tighter the better...but each has to be fairly consistent throughout...
2006 (One of these days I'll have more albums linked)
LeAnna

It's not a home unless there's a cat messing with my yarn...
"They would never give me enough work to last the whole day, so I'd work for 4 hours and then sit up in the crane and crochet," Mrs. Anna
Walentynowicz from Poland (paraphrased.)
"You've just got not to be so scared," Francesca's grandmother in Strictly Ballroom.

#15 alibra

alibra

  • Offline
  • Villager
  • 5,591 posts

  • Joined 27-September 06
  • Location: Chelmsford,Massachusetts

Posted 29 January 2008 - 05:45 AM

I agree with the people above, the one important thing I think especially when you are first learning is to keep a count of the stitches especially in the first couple of rows.