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How to crochet faster?


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#1 Gran

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 02:44 PM

I would like to know the technical aspects and mental strategies/tactics of crocheting FAST. If you are a very quick crocheter and would be willing to share the how-to's you know, could you please post them?

Thanks!
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#2 kisha29

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 11:20 PM

I don't know if this will help at all but I've notice that if I'm not paying attention or watching a show/movie that I've seen before and my mind wanders I go faster. I don't know. Hope that helps some :hug :hug :hug

#3 Aggie May

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 12:59 AM

:cheer Remember, if you go too fast, you get a long way, sometimes, before you notice you have made a mistake.
:cheer I can go fairly fast and I think it is all in the way you hold your yarn, hook etc. Also depends how your yarn flows from the ball.
I made a wee video of how I crochet and I notice on my Photobucket you can add a video so I will have a go at doing that.
I will let you know if it works.
Have fun.
Colleen.:hug
http://s20.photobuck...ngsocceretc.flv
Well, I worked out how to add the video to my Photobucket and I have checked it out and it does work.
My husband was the camera man and I did not mean for him to scan my weed-riddeen pots at the beginning. They have been weeded now. Also there seems to be a few pauses in the Video but I think it happened because it was a bit too long and photobucket abbreviated it. Still seems to make sense though.
I did not put a voice with it because I dont like how I sound on a Video but I think it is self-explanitory. I did a couple of rows of DCs and a row of SCs. It was more to show the grip style and how to hold the yarn. I did not realise how I stuck out my pinkey finger until I watched it.
I am sure everyone with a Digital camera will now be putting little videos together to show how they crochet.
If I get to make a better one, I will delete this one.
Have fun.
Colleen.
PS I hope it works on here as it did for me.

#4 queen_mo

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 06:22 AM

I think a lot of it has to do with how you hold your hook and yarn. I hold the hook like a knife, but the way I hold the yarn allows me to do most of the movement with the hook. I don't actually 'yarn over', I 'hook under'. Other than that, it mostly just takes practice and experience. But don't get so caught up in the speed that you neglect technique (especially gauge and tension).
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#5 CLLinda

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 06:33 AM

One thing I heard to help crochet faster is to use inline or Susan Bates type hooks. I don't know why, but Lily Chin says that you can go faster using this type of hook.

Good posture is also important.

I consider myself pretty fast, but I still enjoy doing what I do. The big thing with crochet is to relax and enjoy what you are making.

And people who have been crocheting for many years are of course a lot faster than someone who is a newbie. Enjoy crochet for what it is.

Linda:manyheart

#6 salos

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 06:51 AM

I agree with Aggie May that a smooth flow of yarn from the skein helps speed things up. When it is tight, I pull out a few yards at a time and leave them in strands on my couch.

One way I go faster is to just do it. If I try to go at 100%, I mess up, but if I try to go at 80%, I go pretty quickly.

Using patterns you know well speeds things up.

Using patterns that have spaces speeds things up. For instance, the granny square takes less time that Priscilla Hewitt's simple square.

Crocheting through one loop (BL only, FL only, etc.) takes more time than crocheting through two loops.

Like Linda said, general speed of how your fingers move has a lot to do with experience.

Studies have shown that holding a hook like a pencil will cause problems like carpal tunnel syndrome. I also hold my hook "like a knife" like Queen Mo said.

#7 Amy

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 08:00 AM

I crochet pretty fast, but I don't know that I have any hints/tips for doing so. My daughter (age 12) is almost as fast as I am, so I'll have to ask her when she gets home from school if she has anything to contribute.

I also hold my hook with a pseudo-knife grip: my thumb lies on the flat part of the hook, with my middle finger draped over the back of the flat part. The bottom of the hook is held loosely, cupped underneath my ring and pinky fingers. My index finger lies lightly against the back shaft of the hook.

I'm left-handed, so my right hand holds the yarn, and doesn't really move at all. I also just noticed that I don't really move my left wrist much at all. It's much more a motion of my whole forearm partially rotating about 45 degrees back and forth. Sometimes I use my index finger to adjust the position of the hook if the arm motion isn't enough to achieve what I need.

Oh, I also use Boye hooks. That is what I learned on, and I've never learned to like using the Bates hooks.

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#8 irikel

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 08:01 AM

AGGIEMAY...that is so kool!:lol
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#9 eyenowhour

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 08:53 AM

I agree that it depends on how you hold your hook and yarn. I've been trying to hold my hook and yarn the "right" way that my mom and everyone else I know does, but it takes me so much longer since I'm really not used to it. I don't know how to describe the way they crochet, though.

#10 mudpie

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:02 AM

First, let me say that there is no "one" right way to hold your hook. The right way is the way that is most comfortable for you. And the most comfortable way may not be the fastest way. I'm not sure of the reasoning for your question, but I don't think one should place too much emphasis on crocheting "fast". That comes naturally with time and practice. I consider that I crochet fairly fast, but when I am pinched for time in which to complete a project, I don't enjoy crocheting as much. For me, personally, I crochet to relax and unwind.

#11 fran

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:08 AM

This probably sounds silly but I seem to crochet faster if there is fast music playing.

#12 Rachel

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:31 AM

I want to second what mudpie said-that there is no "right" way to hold a hook or yarn, and also no "right" hook. Susan Bates hooks work for Lily Chin. Possibly the woman who whupped her uses Boye hooks, so there goes the " If you want to crochet fast use X brand hooks". Even if two people use the same hook and yarn, and hold the yarn and hook in an identical manner, there will be variations in the movements that the two crocheters use in order to form a stitch. Even a milisecond makes a huge difference in what the brain tells each hand to do, and that's going to create differences. I consider myself a moderately fast crocheter, but I'm always looking for ways to streamline my motions just a little.

#13 Hounddog

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 01:04 PM

I know I crochet faster when I am on a repeat section of the pattern. If I am using thread I can go fast because thread doesn't seem to split as much as yarn either.
Darlene

#14 gretelgrrl

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 03:27 PM

my crochet speed varies based on my mood, project, hook size, yarn size... and what I am doing while I crochet. I crochet very, very quickly when I am in the mood to get a lot done... especially if I am using a large hook, thick yarn (even 2-3 strands).... and making something with a lot of spaces (as someone mentioned).
so many variables!
But sometimes, if I just like the project, I can crochet really tight, small stitches with a tiny hook... like my little critters I've been making. Mostly because I see such progress so quickly.

Anyway... just have fun with it. You'll find your speed.

I don't do it to finish tons of projects quickly as my goal. My goal is to "unwind" as I wind the yarn around my hook. To keep my hands busy so I can relax at the end of a long day. The end result is that I usually finish projects quickly.... just as a side effect! :) :yarn
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#15 Gran

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 05:47 PM

Thanks very much for the thoughts and ideas, and a special thanks to Aggie May for the very helpful video. :) I really appreciate you all doing this.

I'd welcome even more ideas on the technical, tactical, strategical, or experiential aspects of how to crochet speedily?????????
Please use only my C'ville name "GRAN" in your posts. Thanks.
To our mothers, our grandmothers, and their mothers...(Avatar photo is by courtesy the American Press.)


May you be blessed with warmth in your home, love in your heart, peace in your soul, and joy in your life.

#16 Rachel

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 11:39 PM

Do you crochet holding the hook like a knife (overhand), or like a pencil (underhand)? Does your entire arm move from the shoulder as you work to make a stitch, or are the movements you use centered in the forearm and wrist? If we know this, it well could be that we could suggest ways to make your movements smaller, and possibly quicker.

#17 Gran

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 03:44 PM

Knife, small movement in wrist and finger. Left-handed. Little movement of right forefinger (except in new stitches and foundation rows).
Please use only my C'ville name "GRAN" in your posts. Thanks.
To our mothers, our grandmothers, and their mothers...(Avatar photo is by courtesy the American Press.)


May you be blessed with warmth in your home, love in your heart, peace in your soul, and joy in your life.

#18 KateCrochets

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 07:36 PM

There are some parts of "crocheting fast" that just can't be explained... I think for me a not-so-healthy addiction to Tetris in 5th grade is one of my biggest boons :lol I'm not sure I would suggest trying that, though!

There are a few things I didn't see mentioned explicitly:
(1) I like to use a center pull ball that was wound twice (that is, I wind it from the skein to a center pull ball, and then wind the center pull ball to a new center pull ball.) I feel like this gives it the best tension... not to loose, but I don't have to stop and pull (does double balling really help? that's another subject altogether, but I feel better, so at least it helps mentally!).
(2) Place your yarn carefully! I always put my yarn directly next to my left leg, as it hangs right for me. YMMV. From what I've noticed from watching other people crochet that differs from how I crochet, I do nearly all of my movement with my hook hand, and merely flick my finger to "hook under" (as opposed to yarn over, like queen_mo said).
(3) I have to reiterate what queen_mo said, again, that "hook under" vs "yarn over" is probably the biggest "time saver" for me. Both in knit and crochet, I don't move my left hand to loop the yarn, I just flick my finger a little to hook under. But I do this because it just comes naturally to me and is the most comfortable for me. Otherwise, I wouldn't crochet or knit much, because it felt odd, and I would REALLY crawl at finishing projects! :-)

HTH, :yarn

#19 crochet.sandie

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Posted 15 May 2006 - 02:40 PM

I don't think anyone said this. If so, I missed it. I use a yarn bag when I crochet. I hang it up, use a center pull, and I don't know if it helps me crochet faster, but it helps me to crochet often. I have two. wish I had a dozen. I have one hanging by my desk so I can just pick up my yarn and go. I also have one on my treadmill. It looks like one of those plastic bag holders but is shorter. I have a picture here.

Not having the yarn rolling around on the floor, I think, speeds things up.

#20 Gran

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Posted 15 May 2006 - 02:46 PM

I've a hunch that my missing element is indeed the yarn itself. I do appreciate these ideas and articulations of experience! When I trained myself to be a hook under instead of a yarn over, it changed my crocheting radically. My tension evened up (and get tighter), and I got a lot faster.

Now, I'm going to try experimenting with how the yarn gets into my hand. Had never thought of a yarn bag (see Sandie's photo) or the double ball method.... Thanks much!

Any more?
Please use only my C'ville name "GRAN" in your posts. Thanks.
To our mothers, our grandmothers, and their mothers...(Avatar photo is by courtesy the American Press.)


May you be blessed with warmth in your home, love in your heart, peace in your soul, and joy in your life.